Why Replace What’s Not Broken

Why Replace What’s Not Broken

The first is that there’s nothing in this world with infinite life. The second is that ageing slows everyone and everything down.
We can all now agree that tech, much like other aspects of life must be upgraded and updated regularly, but this can be expensive and time consuming- so what alternatives do we have?

We can liken a computer to our own bodies. To optimise our lives and the functions of our bodies for as long as possible we (try) to maintain a healthy diet, get enough sleep, exercise regularly and keep ourselves happy.
The same goes for our computers: to keep them running in the best condition for as long as possible, we must implement best practices. What are these best practices?
  • Regular computer clean-ups by dusting them off to make sure there is a good air circulation. This prolongs the life of computer parts.
  • Regular software clean-up by removing unwanted temporary files and programs. This prevents the computer being bogged down and running out of space, and helps it run faster and lighter.
  • Keep a consistent temperature in your working environment.
  • Shut down and switch off mains switches when power isn’t required.
  • Making sure that the HDD is in a horizontal position.
95% of us wouldn't have done these things. I, myself, am included in the statistic. We all want the maximum return on investment for any piece of tech.

The question is, are we stretching our tech out too much? And does this cost us time and peace of mind- arguably, two things just as valuable as money itself.
I believe that the lifespan for most IT devices is between 3 to 5 years. The cost to maintain infrastructure tends to exceed its value after this period of time.

This might be due to manufacturers and vendors phasing out production and technical support. This makes is harder to replace old parts and get help with failing software. It’s annoying and tiresome- don’t fall into this trap.

When in doubt, get the experts to help out!